208.639.7724

Mike Van Artsdalen from Blind Appeal is here to talk about some of the window covering options that are out there. Ron Wieczorek from Eagle Home Mortgage fills us in on how millenials are fitting into the current housing market and finally, Thom and Dave touch base on something that is on a lot of homeowners' minds right now. Tax assessments.

 

Segment 1

 

Dave Burnett:

This is the Idaho Real Estate Buzz with Thom Dallman of Core Group Realty, CoreGroupRealty.com. Give a call today. 208-933-7777. Find out why they say, "You always get more with Core."

This is the Idaho Real Estate Buzz with Thom Dallman the co-owner designated broker of Core Group Realty. CoreGroupRealty.com is the website. 208-933-7777. That's the phone number for you to call if you want any information. If you want to go online, very friendly easy to use website.

 

Thom Dallman:

Oh yeah. Super easy, super easy to navigate. Lots of information there. All kinds of little spots that you can go find out information. We have our search site connected to it, so you can go and look at the latest listings that are out there and available if you're interested in buying a house. If you're interested in selling, we've got information about some of our programs and things like that. We have a sign up sheet to let us know about your house, so that we can come out and give you a free market analysis on it.

 

Dave Burnett:

You know the nice thing is ... I was listening back to some of the podcast, which by the way you can get at CoreGroupRealty.com.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yep.

 

Dave Burnett:

From about a year ago, going into the fall last year and these first segments it was like, well the market is tight there's not a lot.

 

Thom Dallman:

Listings yeah.

 

Dave Burnett:

The good news is things have loosened up a bit and there are some new listings for you.

 

Thom Dallman:

We do have new listings thankfully. People are kind of loosening up and kind of getting things on the market again, so obviously the new construction's been prevalent. We've talked about that in the past too that we're about a quarter of the sales that happen each month are new construction. Luckily, we've got listings out there and they're starting to come on for resale and you know still kind of a short inventory. We're still kind of low on inventory, but at least we've got them going and flowing this summer and have options for people.

 

Dave Burnett:

The good news is looking over your shoulder we've been talking about a lot of rural areas. You've got some listings right in Boise for those who.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yeah, we've got three listings that I wanted to chat about today and yeah. They're right here within Boise city limits. Great options for everybody out there looking.

 

Dave Burnett:

What you got?

 

Thom Dallman:

The first one I want to talk about is out in Charter Point. Great subdivision. Just out there at Maple Grove and Lake Hazel. So, on the south side of the Boise perimeter. I guess you could say and this one's a ... The address is 6603 South Acacia Avenue. And this is a 1900 square foot house. Three bedroom two and a half bath. Two story. It's got a great back yard with some trees growing in it. They've got a little area for putting in a garden if you want, but this one's listed at $250,000  so right in that kind of lower, medium price point that we're at right now. It's a great entry level home for those out there looking to buy in that price point.

 

Dave Burnett:

Yep and in the city limits of Boise. It's getting more and more difficult to find those.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exactly. It really is.

 

Dave Burnett:

If this is one you want to see... you may want to...

 

Thom Dallman:

... at $250,000 and below is a really super difficult.

 

Dave Burnett:

Yep.

 

Thom Dallman:

And I really like Charter Point. I've got probably about five or six families right now that have bought with me throughout the 13 years that I've been doing this that still live there. They have lived there for as long as eight years, and stuff like that.

 

Dave Burnett:

Nice.

 

Thom Dallman:

...and stuff like that, so really is a nice great subdivision to check out.

 

Dave Burnett:

All right. What's second on the list?

 

Thom Dallman:

Second on the list also $250,000 is 6900 West Ustick. This is on a quarter acre lot right here in Boise right off of Cole and Ustick and it's a three bedroom, two bath. One of the bedroom's is actually being used as a living room right now. Doesn't have a closet in it, but it does have it's own bathroom, so the other two bedrooms share a bathroom. Easy to put in. There's plenty of room there to out in a closet to make it a master suite. It's 1800 square feet. Single level, so ... And it's right there at Ustick and Cole. Just great convenient spot to everything. Easy access to the freeway. Easy access to downtown and all that fun stuff, so it's got hardwood floors throughout. It's got granite countertops.Back patio for privacy and everything for those that need the shop and RV parking, it's got that too.

 

Dave Burnett:

A real big lot.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yeah, and a real big lot. So, quarter acre within Boise limits. It's actually .29.

 

Dave Burnett:

Nice.

 

Thom Dallman:

Almost a third of an acre, so yeah. Definitely worth checking out.

 

Dave Burnett:

little elbow room right there in the middle of West Boise.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exactly.

 

Dave Burnett:

Nice, okay. So, that's Cole and Ustick area.

 

Thom Dallman:

Cole and Ustick and then the last one that we've got is over here at Victory and Cloverdale as well. It's 350 South Zion. 83709 zip code. This is a four bedroom, two and a half bath, two story. 2500 square feet, so nice big giant home. Also on just under a quarter acre lot. This is listed at $350,000. Just a must see house. It's great location once again kind of off there ... Off of the Cloverdale, so you can jump on the freeway. Get all that business area over there. Eagle Road and ...

 

Dave Burnett:

Victory.

 

Thom Dallman:

Victory and stuff, so definitely worth checking out and seeing what it's got. It's got a three car garage. It's also got RV parking. Huge garden space. Fresh paint inside and out. New flooring. New stainless steel appliances. Has an office downstairs that can be easily converted into a fifth bedroom, so if anybody needs five bedrooms, there's an option there for that. Mature yard and everything. Check it out. Go to CoreGroupRealty.com and check out our featured listings. It has all of our active listings on there that you can see.

 

Dave Burnett:

You know it's kind of funny. You had a real quick sentence there, but it's huge. A mature yard.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yes.

 

Dave Burnett:

When it comes to your landscaping, to have mature trees. To have the grass that's established, that's a big deal.

 

Thom Dallman:

That's a huge thing.

 

Dave Burnett:

I mean some people like to ... I want to start from scratch.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yep.

 

Dave Burnett:

You know, me, I like having just one that's all set up and ready to go with shade trees and looks good.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exactly.

 

Dave Burnett:

That truly is a big deal. The website is CoreGroupRealty.com. Check that out and you can do it at your leisure. You can sit down on the back deck you know on a Saturday.

 

Thom Dallman:

Bring your laptop out there and just kind of cruise through the houses.

 

Dave Burnett:

Yep, kind of take a look and then when you decide, you know what? Here's some I want to look at, you can give a call. 208-933-7777 and get all set up.

 

Thom Dallman:

Don't forget that these radio blogs are on there as well, so you can go to the blog site to go to the Idaho Real Estate Buzz and listen to all the past segments that we've talked about. All kinds of different things.

 

Dave Burnett:

Yeah. It truly is, to me it's interesting in that it's not just about buying and selling homes. There's how to take care of your home. You have different vendors that come on that sometimes they just share ... Some I learned stuff I've owned a home a long time. I was like really? I didn't know that.

 

Thom Dallman:

I didn't know that. Exactly.

 

Dave Burnett:

So, you can check those out at CoreGroupRealty.com and of course very easy to use. You can see the different agents that are on staff.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yep.

 

Dave Burnett:

If you want to send Thom a note, you can drop him a note as well.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yeah, my information's on there.

 

Dave Burnett:

It's the Idaho Real Estate Buzz. We talk about real estate and about your home and about things going on around the valley. All being brought to you by Core Group Realty. Go to CoreGroupRealty.com or call 208-933-7777. Find out why they say, "You get more with Core."

 

 

 

 

Segment 2

 

Dave Burnett:

This is the Idaho Real Estate buzz with Thom Dallman, the designated broker of Core Group Realty. Coregrouprealty.com is a website, and of course you could always call 208 933 7777. One of the things we get to do each and every week is talk a little bit about finances and of course Ron joins us from Eagle Home Mortgage again today.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yep, one of our favorite lenders.

 

Ron Wieczorek:

How you guys doing?

 

Dave Burnett:

Great.

 

Thom Dallman:

Good.

 

Dave Burnett:

We've talked over the past few weeks about a number of things. We've talked about millennials and where they fit into the loan business and what's going on.

 

Ron Wieczorek:

We talked very positive about millennials.

 

Thom Dallman:

It was all positive stuff.

 

Thom Dallman:

Well, I guess my question is this. Let's talk a little bit about this. Who is this taking out loans right now for homes? I mean, we talked about some of the millennials, that more of them are renting than others, and family ... Who is buying homes right now?

 

Ron Wieczorek:

Well, the millennials are into the market pretty heavily now, and a lot of people say they're late to the game. And they're late to the game, maybe by the standards of our parents or our grandparents because there was an expectation of you hit 18 to 20 years old, and that's the time to start thinking about a family, and one person goes off to work and they provide for the family. And that's where we start. Well, now that's not happening as much. The education levels are higher so you're already starting your career later and maybe you don't find what you want to do right away. And getting married later, starting families later. So now we're starting to see that in the market. So we do see a lot of that generation entering the market. So they are the ones primarily buying.

An interesting step that I did see was, and it kind of surprised me. It didn't surprise me from 2006 to 2016 that homeowners with children had declined by 3.6 million or 14%. And when we say with children and what we talk about is minors, anyone under 18 is considered a children in this stat, and it's still a predominantly ... They're the ones that want to get into the housing market, but they've been stalled a little bit for a number of reasons. One of the big reasons is entry level housing. They're starting to get out-priced in that ballpark. So then they look at, even with rents going up, the rent is averaging, I think it was like 1406 nationwide.

 

Dave Burnett:

That's crazy.

 

Ron Wieczorek:

And it's a little lower in the Valley, but it's higher in a lot of different pockets. So when you're starting a new family and you're not sure about your career and now you're getting priced out of some homes, it seems like we have the younger generations of renting more, with aspirations to buy. So I think it's a two pronged approach. That generation does want to buy. They're ready to buy and we're not building enough entry level homes at this point to sustain that demand. Now we're still building them. They're still there, and Thom can attest to that.

 

Thom Dallman:

Oh, yeah, they're still building here.

 

Ron Wieczorek:

But it is fascinating to me that 29% of families in the United States with minors own, and over 33% rent. So that's a big number to me that we're not capturing yet or haven't been invited into our market.

 

Dave Burnett:

If I'm a builder and I have the opportunity to build a half a million dollar home, or if have the opportunity to build a $200,000 home, which one do you think I'm going to do? I mean, honestly-

 

Ron Wieczorek:

Dave, you're sounding very greedy, Dave.

 

Dave Burnett:

Well, I'm sounding very capitalist, but that's what's going to happen? But what will it take to get that turned around to where somebody who's going to say, you know what? We're going to take this subdivision. We're going to build $250,000 homes, entry level homes, which seems weird to say a quarter of a million dollar home is entry level. What is it going to take or what's going to have to happen for that to begin to happen because if you're just coming out of college, you have college debt, maybe have one child at this point. It's tough to get into a home, isn't it?

 

Ron Wieczorek:

It is.

 

Thom Dallman:

It is. I mean we do have a couple of builders out there that do work on those entry level homes, and they are available. The unfortunate thing is that it's just like Ron said, the prices are going up, and so those entry level homes are going up along with it. So it's not like we don't have builders out there building these entry level homes. It's just that they can get more for what they're building. And I believe Ron mentioned before we started that lumber's costs are going up and stuff like that. And so of course the builders are going to have to pass that on through their houses and stuff like that. So there are entry level houses out there and builders building them. It's just a matter of can- .

 

Dave Burnett:

Are they selling? Those entry level-

 

Ron Wieczorek:

Oh, they, they fly off the mark, and it's not that, like, to Thom's point, it's not that they're not being built, it's just not at the ... Because that is such a massive generation and the age gap in that generation is such a large age range that there's a lot entering the market. So it's more of a can't keep up the demand. You don't want every house to be a starter home.

 

Dave Burnett:

No.

 

Ron Wieczorek:

So you have to have that mix. So when you're doing that, and you have this large influx of buyers, I think it's just hard to meet all the demand that they would need for that in an area. And I kind of mentioned during the break we talked about two things that are slowing building down, and Thom's like, "I see a lot of building. I don't know what you're talking about." But there's a couple things that have made it ... They're not issuing permits as fast as the demand is there. Now they're doing it probably what they think is a record pace. But it's not at what the demand is. So you have the permits and then you have a little bit of the price point. We talked about the average price of a home is going up, and a lot of it has to do with a demand and a lot has to do with the tariffs on lumber. So as those prices go up, the cost to build goes up, so those homes will ... And naturally new homes are going to be pricier than an existing home.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exactly.

 

Ron Wieczorek:

And I think to tie a bow on that part of the conversation I'm going to pick on the baby boomers again. A lot of baby boomers downsize to what can be considered entry level homes and they're not giving them up because they're healthier now and they're staying in that home a little bit longer or they're saying, "I don't need your assisted living. I've been here 20 years, I'm going to stay here." Or, "I just bought this house a few years ago and I'm staying." So we get that a lot too. So that's kind of causing a clog in that demand, and that's pushing some of those millennials to maybe rent longer than they wanted to, even though now they're ready. Yeah, so I think it's a demand issue, and I think they're building, I just don't think it's fast enough to meet that demand that's out there.

 

Dave Burnett:

I guess one other question just on this as well, for a city and in planning for a city, to build a whole subdivision of entry level homes, which is good for now, but 20 years from now that will be a low income neighborhood.

 

Thom Dallman:

Sure.

 

Ron Wieczorek:

Yeah.

 

Thom Dallman:

So for a city in planning, they've got to go, "Well, hang on here, we need to think down the road as well as to how that will work." So it causes problems there.

 

Dave Burnett:

You have to have a good mix, right? And that's part of it too, but to say they're not building any is it would, I'd be coming off as that's not accurate. But it's just not meeting the demand, which is probably good for our business for a number of years. Switch gears a little bit to the WalletHub survey that I was reading and they were talking about the best values, and when they talk about the best values, they're talking about home price versus taxes because that all goes into your payment. There are some pockets where home prices are pretty reasonable, but the taxes are egregious. So you can't afford the house just based off their taxes.

 

Thom Dallman:

You can afford the house, but you can't afford the taxes.

 

Dave Burnett:

Right. And unfortunately they go together. And they categorized the top three cities in the United States, and they went by the best value for the largest city, the best value for the small city and the best value for the midsize city. And even with the growth that we've had in Boise, we're number one in the class for midsize for best value for taxes.

 

Thom Dallman:

Number one?!

 

Dave Burnett:

Number one midsize.

 

Thom Dallman:

Don't tell anyone.

 

Dave Burnett:

I just did.

 

Ron Wieczorek:

Now everybody knows.

 

Dave Burnett:

So that's-  I'll just talk about the two other ones on the list. Best large city was Tampa, Florida, and the smallest city was ... Anybody?

 

Ron Wieczorek:

Somewhere in Montana.

 

Thom Dallman:

I have no idea.

 

Dave Burnett:

Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. How is that not just on the tip of your tongue?

 

Thom Dallman:

Right?

 

Ron Wieczorek:

Never would have guessed that.

 

Thom Dallman:

And it's beautiful there this time of year.

 

Ron Wieczorek:

Somebody's on the radio at Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, saying, "Boise, Idaho. You never would have guessed it."

 

Thom Dallman:

Yeah, well, that's my point.

 

Dave Burnett:

Right.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exactly.

 

Dave Burnett:

Well, that is fascinating because if you talk to somebody, everyone gripes about their taxes. "Oh, my tax..." My tax bill went up this year, but it's still economical compared to the area.

 

Ron Wieczorek:

Oh, it's, extremely economical. I've been in lending for 17 years and the first 13 and a half of it was in a national bank and we serviced a large portfolio of loans. So I saw what was going on nationwide every day. And there's pockets in Texas and New York and coastal areas that the taxes that are just ... You're talking about a home that's a quarter million dollars a week, considered an entry level home or higher that had $10,000 in taxes. Wow. And when I look at that same house in Boise, it's not even a quarter of that. It's still maybe even a fifth or sixth of that, actually.

 

Thom Dallman:

Do me a favor though. Don't let any politicians see that survey.

 

Ron Wieczorek:

Alright.

 

Thom Dallman:

That could change all of that because I mean that's the bottom line, is if you go look in the Bay Area around San Jose, you look at not only the cost of the home but the taxes on a home, it is just insane.

 

Ron Wieczorek:

Exactly. And they get double that. They get the taxes and the prices. I use Texas as an example because when the market crashed, Texas never went up during the bust, not to a degree that other areas did, but they were almost, I hate to say recession proof, but kind of recession proof when it went down because they didn't move the dial down much. So they had the stability of what the price of the houses were, but they have a couple of other things working into their taxes, whether it's school districts or things that we don't have in the Valley as much, but it was $400 or $500 a month for your just run of the mill home. You're not talking about a higher end. I'm talking about the starter level. So, yeah, you can afford the house like you said, but not the taxes.

 

Thom Dallman:

Ron is with this with Eagle Home Mortgage, and I guess I want to give you just a second or two to plug some products here in that if somebody is looking to get into the marketplace, maybe they're a first time home buyer, there are some very affordable loans out there for those who are coming out looking to get in.

 

Ron Wieczorek:

And that's a good point because a lot of times I still hear ... What my parents told me was 20% down, 20% down, 20% down, and I was like, I don't know if I'll ever be able to buy a home, right? And if, if that was the case, I still wouldn't be in a home, but luckily I am. There was a lot of programs that you can even go down to a 0.5% if you're not a veteran. Veterans can go 0% down and they deserve to use that entitlement. But if you're not a veteran then you can go 0.5% down, 1% down. It's credit driven, but the state of Idaho has one of the best programs, and I've dealt with them statewide, we call them bond programs. And Idaho has, if not the best one I've dealt with, it's top tier. They really bend over backwards for putting new homeowners into loans.

 

Thom Dallman:

Ron, if somebody wants to get hold of you to talk about this, how do they get hold of you there at Eagle Home Mortgage?

 

Ron Wieczorek:

My cell phone is 208 869 9154, and I'm usually within a finger's reach of it.

 

Dave Burnett:

Very good. Eagle Home Mortgage, equal opportunity lender. We'll continue on the other side. This is the Idaho Real Estate Buzz being brought to you by Core Group Realty. Find out why they say you get more with Core.

 

 

 

Segment 3

 

 

Dave Burnett:

This is the Idaho Real Estate Buzz. He is Thom Dallman, the co-owner, designated broker of Core Group Realty, CoreGroupRealty.com. That's the website you can go to. Of course, you have your preferred vendors and folks that you work with.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yeah, one of the tabs on there is the service providers where we have all the people that we have great relationships with and have had great interactions with. Sorry. They've treated our clients really well, we know that we can trust them with all of our clients' needs and stuff like that. So Service Provider tab on the CoreGroupRealty.com page is where you go find everybody on there.

 

Dave Burnett:

You know, one of the vendors that you'll find, if you have any modesty at all and you want to put blinds up in your house, this is somebody to talk to. That would be Mike Van ... It's Artsdalen?

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Yeah, it's Van Artsdalen.

 

Thom Dallman:

There you go. You did it.

 

Dave Burnett:

With Blind Appeal. How about that. Well, Mike, let's talk a little bit about blinds because, really, unless you're going to go without any blinds at all, which isn't real practical for most of us, it's something that you can go on the cheap and wind up ... I guess it's one of those things you kind of get what you pay for.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Yes, yeah.

 

Dave Burnett:

If you go too cheap, you kind of get problems.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

There's all levels of products and quality in each product, and then price ranges within those. So a two-inch blind, you could get one from a box store for super cheap or you can get one that's high quality that's going to last you forever. So yeah, a lot of different price ranges in there.

 

Dave Burnett:

The truth is, really, when you come to your home, blinds really can make a difference in a room. You get the right blind, you get the right cut on it, and you can really be happy.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Oh, yeah. There's a lot of different fabrics and patterns and designs and styles of window coverings. Yeah, just makes the home.

 

Dave Burnett:

With Blind Appeal, what do you find happening as far as trends, what are happening? I mean, we've gone through the two-inch faux woods and we've gone through a number of different things. What's happening in blinds these days?

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

I think trends a lot of times is going to have to do with the style of home, and then also the homeowner, what they're into. So we see a lot of different variety of trends, so shutters are pretty popular in a lot of the new custom homes, or if it's a more modern, you're looking at the lower transitional type shade. Roller shades are pretty popular these days, and then-

 

Dave Burnett:

Which they were at that time. Roller shades were the [inaudible 00:02:26].

 

Thom Dallman:

The roller shades, yeah. That seemed like the popular thing last year at the Parade of Homes.

 

Dave Burnett:

Yeah. They went away, but now they're back.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yeah, exactly.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

So then also the cellular or honeycomb type shades with the top down. People are into those a lot as well.

 

Dave Burnett:

Top down bottom up.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Yep. But I guess another big trend is the motorization option. A lot of motorizations are going on now because you can set it with your cell phone or have it on a timer.

 

Dave Burnett:

I was wondering if there was something ... These smart homes we've been seeing so much, blinds is one of those things that operates with a smart home.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Sure.

 

Dave Burnett:

You can tell Alexa to raise your blinds.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Yeah, exactly. Yeah, we have systems that can set that in place. Then, also exterior shades, especially this time of year is a very big trend because of that south or west facing home with a covered patio or just those big windows on the south or west. People get a lot of that sun and heat, so usually spring we start doing a lot of exterior shades.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exterior shades.

 

Dave Burnett:

The sun can do a lot of damage when it comes to carpeting or maybe hardwood flooring. The sun can do a lot of damage.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Oh, yeah. Definitely. We do a lot of window tint as well, which that cuts like 99.9% of the UVs, which would protect your furniture, flooring, counters, or cabinets, whatever the sun's hitting. It also actually will protect your window coverings as well, keep them working, functioning properly longer, keep them from warping and fading.

 

Dave Burnett:

Let me ask you this when it comes to tinting, because I think most everybody's had the experience of trying to do it themselves.

 

Thom Dallman:

Oh my gosh.

 

Dave Burnett:

With a squeegee, all those bubbles, and it's peeling. That's something that, really, there is kind of a trick to it to get it down to where it really looks good, isn't there?

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Yeah, yeah. We guarantee to not have any bubbles or for it to fade. I don't install it myself, but our installers are super, super great at it and they're perfect every time.

 

Thom Dallman:

I've never even really thought about you guys actually doing the tinting on windows as well as the blinds and stuff like that. That's fascinating to me a little bit, and the fact that tinting can be a great way to, like you said, protect an extra level against the UV rays coming in and stuff like that. So that's a great option for people too.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

What's nice about that is you can have your window coverings up and open and you can still see out, but you're still getting that UV protection.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exactly.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

That's a good way to go.

 

Dave Burnett:

What are some of the other products for UV protection, other than tint? What are some of the other products out there?

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Obviously, if you have a blackout shade, so the honeycombs, you can get it blackout. There's a little Mylar in the center so it blocks all the sun completely, or the light from filtering in. Roller shades, they have a similar way of doing it with blackout. But you're still going to get some of those side gaps along the edges of the window, so it's not 100% UV protected. But yeah, I'd say either the blackout roller shades or cell shades, and then there's also solar shades. They're kind of like a mesh which lets in ... There's like 1% up to 5%, so that's like a 5% light coming in, so it's blocking like 95% of that UV. But you can still see out, so you can still see trees in your yard while having those shades down. It's cutting down most of the UVs, but not all of it.

 

Thom Dallman:

Not all of it. Huh, interesting. That sounds like so sci-fi. Solar shades.

 

Dave Burnett:

Here comes a question when it comes to blinds, Thom.

 

Thom Dallman:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

 

Dave Burnett:

Maintenance and cleaning.

 

Thom Dallman:

Oh, yes.

 

Dave Burnett:

Oh my god. What a nightmare. Cleaning blinds ... I guess they used to call them mini blinds, but cleaning those slatted blinds, is there a trick to maintenance and how to take care of those?

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

The trick is to just plan ahead and know that you have half a day of doing it.

 

Dave Burnett:

I guess my wife always says, "No, if we do it more often it won't be as bad." So do it a little more often.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Yeah, those horizontal blinds that's the number one thing I hear the most is people don't want to clean them or dust them. That can be a pain, but yeah, it's just taking the time to do that. But with other products, like a roller shade or a cell shade or honeycomb, you can actually just take a vacuum like once a year. They're very durable, so you can just vacuum it off with the little hand nozzle of the vacuum pretty much like once a year. I mean, if somebody went five years or more without them, it'll start to look dingy.

 

Dave Burnett:

Time for new blinds.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Yeah, they don't take a whole lot of maintenance in that way. Yeah, just dusting them once, or if it's the fabric, at least vacuum once a year and the dusting is ... There's no easy trick to that, I guess, but we do have somebody who does clean blinds for us that does an ultrasonic where they take the blind down and dip it in the solution and it ultrasonically cleans it and then they can go and put them back up.

 

Thom Dallman:

Oh, interesting.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

There's a whole science behind that.

 

Dave Burnett:

Mike Van Artsdalen is with us. He's with Blind Appeal. How long have you been, and what got you into the blind business?

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

My uncle started the business in 2007. I was a school teacher and it was tough paying the bills, so he brought me over. I've worked with him for about two and a half years. I didn't get a degree in window coverings, but-

 

Dave Burnett:

You learned through the school.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

I joined the family business and it's been great ever since. My mom works for us, my brother, my cousins.

 

Dave Burnett:

So Blind Appeal truly is a family business.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Yes.

 

Thom Dallman:

That's awesome.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

It's about half of us are all in the family, so 50/50.

 

Dave Burnett:

Nice. At Thanksgiving-

 

Thom Dallman:

Just like Core Group. Locally owned, locally grown.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Right. Yep, so we're just local. Frank started the business all on his own. We're not a franchise or anything.

 

Dave Burnett:

Do you see anything new, Mike, coming out with blinds that maybe the next five years things will change in the way blinds work?

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

I think the most thing is they're getting more and more away from having cords due to safety issues. Yeah, it's just a lot cleaner and they function really well. I think that's probably going to be one of the biggest, is you're probably going to see more cordless options and probably see a lot more motorized options going in.

 

Dave Burnett:

Which for some of these homes, I went and looked at a couple of the Parade of Homes. They have some really tall ceilings. But those motorized blinds for those that are way out of reach is a really good option.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Yeah. That's where we see a lot of people using the motorized, is when they're way up on the second level and they can't reach them.

 

Dave Burnett:

Yeah. With Blind Appeal, then, if you have an odd-shaped window that's something that you guys can get custom made?

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Yeah. All of our products are actually custom made. We go into the home and fine measure every window and make every product for that specific window.

 

Dave Burnett:

Nice.

 

Thom Dallman:

What's the oddest shape that you've ever had to make? Circular?

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

I don't know. I think we've had some octagon ones or something like that, but works out pretty good with…

 

Dave Burnett:

How would you do that? That has to be like a top down bottom up on that one.

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

Usually, yeah, you'd go like a shutter on that or you could outside mount a product and have it come on the outside of it.

 

Dave Burnett:

Very good, Mike. If somebody wants to get ahold of you at Blind Appeal, how do they do that?

 

Mike Van Artsdalen:

We have a phone number. 208-888-1056 is our office, and then our website's www.blindappeal.com. Or you can email info@blindappeal.com.

 

Dave Burnett:

And if you're driving and can't get any of that, you can always go to CoreGroupRealty.com-

 

Thom Dallman:

Coregrouprealty.com as well.

 

Dave Burnett:

... and check that out. Thank you, Mike. We appreciate you coming on by and talking to us about blinds. It really is one of those things that can make the real difference in a home and the way it appears, just being a house and being a home.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exactly.

 

Dave Burnett:

Check that out. Blind Appeal. This is the Idaho Real Estate Buzz being brought to you by Core Group Realty, CoreGroupRealty.com. That is the website for you to go to any time, sponsors of the Idaho Real Estate Buzz. Find out why they say you get more with Core.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Segment 4

 

Dave Burnett:

This is the Idaho Real Estate buzz, he is Thom Dallman, the co-owner Designated Broke group, Core Group Realty. Core group reality dot com, the website. 208-933-7777, that is the phone number for you to call. You know, somebody may have gone to their mailbox here in the past couple of weeks and got that little notice from the county assessor.

 

Thom Dallman:

Oh yes, the new assessments.

 

Dave Burnett:

Man, my property went up this year, it's like yikes.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yeah, yeah, its up. Ours went up as well, so, the new tax levy's and all that fun stuff that come out that go toward that.

 

Dave Burnett:

Can you answer this question for me because we had our home appraised here about a year ago, because we refinanced, and the appraisal from the tax guy is not the same as the appraisal from the appraiser. How does that all work?

 

Thom Dallman:

No, yeah, that's a common question that we get, like why is our appraisal so far off from what the house is assessed and so forth.

 

Dave Burnett:

Not that I want my tax appraisal at that value.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yeah, right.

 

Dave Burnett:

I was appraised for more.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exactly, and in some cases it goes the opposite direction, so some people get assessed way higher from the state than the appraisal. Appraisals are done when you're getting either kind of a loan for a new property, or a refinance. That's when appraisals get done. Those are for the lenders, to find the value of the house, to make sure that your loan is adequate to basically, you know, what the house is valued at in today's market place. It's a very in depth process that appraiser goes through, you know, coming to see the house, comparing it other homes in the area.

 

Dave Burnett:

They come in, they look at it.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yep, exactly. They come in, they look at it, and they do an in depth comparison with other homes in the valley. Now, with that being said, we've kind of had an interesting phenomenon happen lately, with the rapid increase in home pricing, where the appraisers are having a hard time finding comparable homes to justify pricing sometimes on homes. For a perfect example, I was showing some property to some clients this week. The house was listed at $240,000 , they had had a a prior contract on it, and the the appraisal came in at $220,000.

 

Dave Burnett:

Woops.

 

Thom Dallman:

The appraiser couldn't find any comparables within the, they usually do a one mile radium, or half mile radius, or within the subdivision. So he went back six months, and so, he was pulling values from six months ago, and our prices have gone up very quickly from six months ago, so that listing agent was trying to dispute that appraisal. We're running into things like that were the appraisers are struggling to justify the increase in pricing on homes and stuff like that. And so we've had to kind of be super creative whether it's the seller and buyers coming up with money to be able to make up the difference. Sometimes the sellers will come down in price to match, and then compare that with the buyers coming up with a little bit more and stuff.

 

Dave Burnett:

Let me ask you this question, and maybe you don't have the answer for me. The tax appraiser, do they just drive by and look at it, or?

 

Thom Dallman:

Yeah, that's the difference between the appraisal and the assessment. Have you ever had an assessor knock on your door and say, "Can I come in and see your house?"

 

Dave Burnett:

No.

 

Thom Dallman:

No, they just do a drive by, they make sure that the house is still there and whatnot. But they don't ever actually come in.

 

Dave Burnett:

But they have no idea.

 

Thom Dallman:

They have no idea what it is compared to other properties in the neighborhood and stuff like that.

 

Dave Burnett:

In my home, in this past year, we put all brand new granite countertops in, all brand new kitchen cabinets, all brand new flooring through it.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exactly, which you might not want to say that too loud in case there is an assessor listening in.

 

Dave Burnett:

And my name is Bill Barrett.

 

Thom Dallman:

But yeah.

 

Dave Burnett:

So they have no idea what's in it.

 

Thom Dallman:

They have no idea what's inside, so that's why you'll see assessments being a lot lower than what the current market value is. But, you know what, on the flip side of that, you'll see assessments that are way higher because they're comparing it to other houses in the area. Maybe your house is not as in good condition as all the other houses in the area. So that's kind of the main difference between the appraisal, is the appraisals for lenders, the assessments for the tax, for the county to get their taxes on your property. And the appraisers come into your house whereas assessors just drive by and kind of just do an off the cuff value of what's-

 

Dave Burnett:

They've gotta get all the properties.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exactly. Another interesting fact about assessments is that not a lot of people realize that they can dispute their assessments on their property. If you get an assessment that's really high, and you feel like your value is not there, and that they've overpriced your house, reach out to a real estate agent. Get some comps on your house, get an evaluation done. Most real estate agents will do this free of charge, we do here at Core Group Reality. We'll be more that happy to do a market analysis, compare your house to all the houses in the neighborhood, and get you an idea of what that current value is. And you can actually take that down to the courthouse and dispute your assessments.

 

Dave Burnett:

File for them, perhaps have them lower it.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exactly. I've read a report recently, down in, it was came out of California, or I'm sorry, out of Seattle that talks about over half of their tax assessments because they have such an issue right now with their tax assessments, over half of the ones that have been disputed have been changed to what the people are showing as their property value. So it does work, it does work to go down to the assessors office, bring your comps, bring your comparables.

 

Dave Burnett:

But there is a time limit, you have to get it done within a certain time frame or so.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exactly, and I'm not sure what that is.

 

Dave Burnett:

Check with your county, to see what that is. Can't dilly dally, you need to get right on it.

 

Thom Dallman:

No, if you got an assessment, and you feel it's too high, contact someone, preferably us, we'll be more than happy to do a market analysis for you, but contact some real estate agent, find out what exactly that value is currently in the marketplace so that you can dispute it, you can fight it.

 

Dave Burnett:

So an assessment of my property, on the value, is something that will always take place if I'm putting it up for sale, correct? I mean that's the lowest amount the lender can get a loan on.

 

Thom Dallman:

The appraisal yes.

 

Dave Burnett:

The appraisal, I'm sorry.

 

Thom Dallman:

The appraisal will always happen, not always, sorry, I will take that back. If you have someone that buys your property via cash, appraisals not needed. There's no need for a cash buyer.

 

Dave Burnett:

But if there's no lender involved.

 

Thom Dallman:

But if there's kind of a lender, there's always usually an appraisal associated with that.

 

Dave Burnett:

So the things that they're gonna look at, the condition of the house, there gonna look at the roof, there gonna look at the, just the property.

 

Thom Dallman:

There gonna look for safety hazard issues for the house. Soundness and safety issues is what we usually call it. So they're gonna look for peeling paint, they're gonna look for exposed wires. They're looking for trip hazards that could 'cause you to stumble and fall, things like that is what the appraisers gonna look at. Longevity, roof like you said, 'cause that obviously you don't want a leaky roof here in the next couple years and stuff like that. They typically want a roof to be able to last about three years is what they say. So yeah, it's, they're checking for that safety and the soundness of the house on the appraisal.

 

Dave Burnett:

Now the appraisal is different than the home inspection, correct?

 

Thom Dallman:

Yes, very different. Remember the appraisal is actually for the lender to verify the cost of the house, and to verify the safety of the house. But the inspection is actually for the buyer's peace of mind, to let the buyer know what they're getting into and making sure that they are asking for the seller to repair major stuff that could be blocking the appraisal. What we don't want is the appraiser to come in, call out the stuff that has to be fixed and then have to have it re-appraisal fee and that stuff. The inspector is a fraction of the cost of an appraisal, but it's great peace of mind, it gets you into the house, gets you the ability to ask the sellers to fix a few things that might be called out on the appraisal.

 

Dave Burnett:

Is that something that if I'm getting ready to sell my house, is it a good idea to have a home inspector come out, go through it and check off those things ahead of time just to-

 

Thom Dallman:

In our listing presentations when we meet with potential people that want to list, we usually tell them it's always a good idea to get a pre-inspection done because that gives you the peace of mind, as a seller of what you could potentially be asked to fix.

 

Dave Burnett:

Yeah, 'cause I don't want to suddenly go oh yeah by the way you need to put a new roof on this for 10,000 dollars. Kinda like to know that ahead of time.

 

Thom Dallman:

Exactly, and so it gives you that seller that edge up, and as far as marketing, we can put it on it's been pre-inspected, we're more than happy to share that inspection with you. A lot of buyers will be like well that's good, I don't have to do my own. It doesn't always work, but they will be happy to see that you've taken that extra step to make sure the house is ready to go for sale.

 

Dave Burnett:

Well if you have not seen it in your mailbox, it will be there soon, and that is that appraisal from the tax man.

 

Thom Dallman:

Yep, the assessments.

 

Dave Burnett:

Saying what your value is, but whether it's high or whether it's low, realize that that is not what the bank is going to sell you. Something different could be happening.

 

Thom Dallman:

We hear it often, hey we got assessed at this or our house is worth this, and I'm like not always.

 

Dave Burnett:

Well Thom, let me ask you this, on your website at core group reality dot com, you have a list of vendors in there, somebody, home inspectors that are listed there.

 

Thom Dallman:

We've got a couple home inspectors there that we have built great relationships with over the years, have done really great job for us, they're there. I recommend having an inspection done if you've lived for five to ten years. Have an inspection done even if you're not thinking about selling just because you just don't know what can happen over five years.

 

Dave Burnett:

Somebodies gotta get down that crawl space, look around, see what's down there. Thom Dallman, Core Group Realty, and of course you're always welcome to go to the website, CoreGroupRealty.com or give a call to 208-933-7777 that is the phone number to call at Core Group Realty. They are the sponsors of the Idaho Real Estate Buzz, a program designed for you, the home owner, the home seller, or the home buyer. Check us out, of course we're every week at this time. We'd love for you to check out the blogs and all the information on the website at Core Group Realty. Be sure to check that out, sponsors of this program, the Idaho Real Estate Buzz. Find out why they say you get more, with Core.

 

 

Blind Appeal

208-888-1056

www.blindappeal.com

 

Eagle Home Mortgage

208 917-4983

EagleHM.com

 

 

Core Group Realty

208 639-7700

CoreGroupRealty.com

 

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